Night Light Photography

This year, during the Christmas holiday, I tried several night photography shots in snowy, cold weather. 

Photo: Close up detail of mini white Christmas lights outdoors at night–photograph by Marie Kazalia

I hadn’t done night photography in a very long time–in fact, the last time I shot at night I was shooting with film in an SLR camera in mild weather temperatures in California.

This year, I’m in snowy, cold temperatures, using a DSLR and the weather conditions created some obstacles for me. Perhaps sharing my experiences here will help you the first time you go out to shoot at night.

Planning Ahead to Get the Best Shots

First, planning ahead is important. Find out what time the sun sets in your area. You can do an online search or download and use an app like the Sunrise Sunset app available free on Google Play and free in the iTunes store. Then plan your travel time so that you arrive before the sun sets so that you can see well enough to plan your compositions and set up your tripod. 

Shoot During the Blue Hour

Once the sun sets, you can begin getting your best shots during the “blue hour.” The “blue hour” is a photography term that refers to the time after the sun goes below the horizon and the sky becomes a deep blue for a while–this can last from 10-15 minutes or even an hour or more. 

Set Your Camera White Balance

You can further enhance the blue sky of the “blue hour” by setting your camera White Balance to the Fluorescent white light setting. Although a Daylight White Balance setting can also yield good results under certain conditions. It’s best to try different settings to get the results you like best.

You can scout-out possible scenes in your area that you’d like to try to photograph at night or you can set something up in your own yard.

I made tests using two strings of white mini lights that I purchased to string up and illuminate at night to try out my camera settings and exposure times. The one below turned out good enough for me to upload to my Shutterstock portfolio and a buyer downloaded it the same day. 

Controlling Bokeh Effects in Your Image

Notice the bokeh effect or defocused lights on the right side of the image that creates a spot pattern. This is a technique very popular with photographers and microstock photo buyers.

Bokeh is a Japanese word that has to do with the aesthetic quality of the blur produced in the out-of-focus areas of a photograph created by the lens. One of the easiest ways to create bokeh light patterns is to use your lens “wide open” –that is at the widest aperture setting, such as f2.8 or f3.5.

Bokeh light pattern–photography by Marie Kazalia

You can defocus the entire night light scene for a completely abstract pattern effect, as above.

Read the entire article and view more images here:

Source: Night Light Photography

Selected by Saatchi Curators for New This Week Collection

I think this may be the 5th time for me to have an artwork featured in a Saatchi collection.

This email:

On behalf of chief curator Rebecca Wilson and the Saatchi Art curation team, I’m very pleased to let you know that your work has been chosen to be featured in the New This Week 3-14-2016 Collection on Saatchi Art’s homepage. You can see the collection here: http://www.saatchiart.com/art-collection/Painting-Collage-Photography/New-This-Week-3-14-2016/153961/130630/view

Screenshot 2016-03-14 at 12.19.54 PM
Saatchi New This Week collection includes painting by Marie Kazalia titled Joggle 3

Prints of Marie Kazalia’s Fluorescent Painting Titled Joggle 3

Joggle 3, Marie Kazalia, January 2014
Joggle 3, Marie Kazalia, January 2014

 

A prints curator contacted me about producing prints of my painting, Joggle 3, for some art collectors. It sounds interesting, and I will find out more and share the details here when I have them. I’m always glad when someone likes my fluorescent paintings, since such bright color is not to everyone’s taste.

VIDA Design Invited Me to Print My Art on Silk Shirts and Scarves

VIDA invited me to become a designer. The curator said that she found my art online and thought I’d be a good fit. So I started by adding two of  my paintings to their site for printing on a variety of tops and scarves. After I uploaded a couple of images, I found that there were lots of controls for sizing and placement. For day one, I tried a few options then selected the designs I preferred. But will find out their choices. They may have other ways of using my art to design their clothing. To start, I submitted these for approval–

Design by Marie Kazalia on silk scarf
Design by Marie Kazalia on silk scarf
Design by Marie Kazalia on silk scarf
Design by Marie Kazalia on silk scarf
design by Marie Kazalia on silk tank top
design by Marie Kazalia on silk tank top
design on silk t shirt by Marie Kazalia
design on silk t shirt by Marie Kazalia

 

Painting by Marie Kazalia in Saatchi Gifts for Mid-Century Modern Lovers Collection

Chief curator Rebecca Wilson and the Saatchi Art curation team, wrote: ” I’m very pleased to let you know that your work has been chosen to be featured in the “Gifts for Mid-Century Modern Lovers” Collection on Saatchi Art’s homepage.” You can see the collection here:  http://www.saatchiart.com/art-collection/Painting-Collage-Photography/Gifts-for-Mid-Century-Modern-Lovers/685448/119287/view.

Scroll down to see my mixed media artwork titled Shinjuku in this collection–

Shinjuku, Marie Kazalia, available as print on metal via Displate.com
Shinjuku, Marie Kazalia, available as print on metal via Displate.com

New Painting with Small Areas of Muted Fluorescent Red

In most of my paintings, I include areas of bright fluorescent red, fluorescent green, or fluorescent orange, and sometimes fluorescent yellow.

I had to make an effort to produce this painting below with no fluorescent paint, but yet, the ground—muted by a wash of my own earth yellow mix–does have spots of fluorescent red around the base of the central form.

helix 1, Marie Kazalia, painting on Coventry Rag fine art paper, 30 x 23 inches, Oct 2015
helix 1, Marie Kazalia, painting on Coventry Rag fine art paper, 30 x 23 inches, Oct 2015

Couple of New Paintings by Marie Kazalia

These are a bit different than what I’ve painted up until now. Simply put, I’ve started adding bits of bright colors–such as fluorescent red and fluorescent green–against larger areas of more muted tones.

In the back of my mind, I’ve been thinking about Picasso–not his forms, shattered faces, or cubism as much as his use of color. y thoughts and observations unconsciously affect my painting.)

What I’ve been paying attention of late, is Picasso’s use of color. Picasso was a brilliant master of color. But one thing about his use of color that has begun to stand out to me, more and more looking at images of his work, is his use of bright color punctuated amid mixed and muted tones. Or, sometimes the reverse–overall intense color punctuated by areas of muted tones. A device of contrast used brilliantly over and over in his work. Take a look at the images of Picasso’s paintings that I’ve collected on my Pinterest board here. I’m not aware of Picasso ever using fluorescent paints, but he, like no other, knew how to handle tone and color so that they work together and create a contrasting separation.

Ogdoad, Marie Kazalia, 2015
Ogdoad, Marie Kazalia, 2015
xeriscaping, painting on Coventry Rag fine art paper, 23 x 30 inches, Oct 2015, Marie Kazalia
xeriscaping, painting on Coventry Rag fine art paper, 23 x 30 inches, Oct 2015, Marie Kazalia