New Painting with Small Areas of Muted Fluorescent Red

In most of my paintings, I include areas of bright fluorescent red, fluorescent green, or fluorescent orange, and sometimes fluorescent yellow.

I had to make an effort to produce this painting below with no fluorescent paint, but yet, the ground—muted by a wash of my own earth yellow mix–does have spots of fluorescent red around the base of the central form.

helix 1, Marie Kazalia, painting on Coventry Rag fine art paper, 30 x 23 inches, Oct 2015
helix 1, Marie Kazalia, painting on Coventry Rag fine art paper, 30 x 23 inches, Oct 2015

Couple of New Paintings by Marie Kazalia

These are a bit different than what I’ve painted up until now. Simply put, I’ve started adding bits of bright colors–such as fluorescent red and fluorescent green–against larger areas of more muted tones.

In the back of my mind, I’ve been thinking about Picasso–not his forms, shattered faces, or cubism as much as his use of color. y thoughts and observations unconsciously affect my painting.)

What I’ve been paying attention of late, is Picasso’s use of color. Picasso was a brilliant master of color. But one thing about his use of color that has begun to stand out to me, more and more looking at images of his work, is his use of bright color punctuated amid mixed and muted tones. Or, sometimes the reverse–overall intense color punctuated by areas of muted tones. A device of contrast used brilliantly over and over in his work. Take a look at the images of Picasso’s paintings that I’ve collected on my Pinterest board here. I’m not aware of Picasso ever using fluorescent paints, but he, like no other, knew how to handle tone and color so that they work together and create a contrasting separation.

Ogdoad, Marie Kazalia, 2015
Ogdoad, Marie Kazalia, 2015
xeriscaping, painting on Coventry Rag fine art paper, 23 x 30 inches, Oct 2015, Marie Kazalia
xeriscaping, painting on Coventry Rag fine art paper, 23 x 30 inches, Oct 2015, Marie Kazalia

Painting on Canvas: line-pattern over fluorescent red/green

It’s difficult to get the camera to see the fluorescent paint the same way it looks to me.

Here is the painting, which I titled Prenomen, an overlay of abstract line work on fluorescent red and green quadrants.

Prenomen, Marie Kazalia, painting on canvas 32 x 24 inches, Jan 2015
Prenomen, Marie Kazalia, painting on canvas 32 x 24 inches, Jan 2015, $1,200USD

I adjusted the exposure to tone-down the glow of the fluorescent colors to more in-keeping with how they actually appear. Here is a cropped version of the same painting but allowing the camera to capture and exaggerate the fluorescent glow–(the painting really does not look this bright at all hanging on a wall).

Prenomen(detail) Marie Kazalia
Prenomen(detail) Marie Kazalia

Rufescent = Reddish Paintings

After new computer system upgrades, my seven-year old Nikon camera card reader became obsolete. Now, using the newest Lightroom software and a new card reader I have access to improved image processing tools.

I’m pleased with these new tools. I cropped the images of my latest paintings in my new Rufescent Series. The word rufescent simply means “reddish” and the three new paintings I’m posting today all have reddish tones– from fluorescent reds to earth reds.

Rufe 1(horizontal), paintings on Coventry Rag fine art paper, 23 x 30 inches, Dec 2014, Marie Kazalia
Rufe 1(horizontal), paintings on Coventry Rag fine art paper, 23 x 30 inches, Dec 2014, Marie Kazalia

Although I painted all three of these paintings in my preferred vertical orientation, I know that many people prefer them horizontal. When framed they can be hung either way.

Rufe 1(vertical), paintings on Coventry Rag fine art paper, 23 x 30 inches, Dec 2014, Marie Kazalia
Rufe 1 (vertical), paintings on Coventry Rag fine art paper, 23 x 30 inches, Dec 2014, Marie Kazalia
Rufe 1(vertical), paintings on Coventry Rag fine art paper, 23 x 30 inches, Dec 2014, Marie Kazalia
Rufe 2 (vertical), paintings on Coventry Rag fine art paper, 23 x 30 inches, Dec 2014, Marie Kazalia
Rufe 2 (horizontal), paintings on Coventry Rag fine art paper, 23 x 30 inches, Dec 2014, Marie Kazalia
Rufe 2 (horizontal), paintings on Coventry Rag fine art paper, 23 x 30 inches, Dec 2014, Marie Kazalia
Rufe 2 ( flipped horizontal), paintings on Coventry Rag fine art paper, 23 x 30 inches, Dec 2014, Marie Kazalia
Rufe 2 ( flipped horizontal), paintings on Coventry Rag fine art paper, 23 x 30 inches, Dec 2014, Marie Kazalia

While the two paintings above work visually at either horizontal or vertical orientation, I prefer the red and green fluorescent painting below at a vertical orientation, which is how I painted it.

Rufe 3, paintings on Coventry Rag fine art paper, 23 x 30 inches, Dec 2014, Marie Kazalia
Rufe 3, paintings on Coventry Rag fine art paper, 23 x 30 inches, Dec 2014, Marie Kazalia
Rufe 3 (horizontal), paintings on Coventry Rag fine art paper, 23 x 30 inches, Dec 2014, Marie Kazalia
Rufe 3 (horizontal), paintings on Coventry Rag fine art paper, 23 x 30 inches, Dec 2014, Marie Kazalia

Metaing

Familiar repeating loops link us to our inner workings—the spiral of our DNA—and out ward in sound waves and in ancient repeating pattern and antique decoration given a contemporary spin in spots or dots on the surface and layered and muted under translucent acrylic and Flashe fine art paints in this painting on Coventry Rag fine art paper.

The title Metaing refers to my flat painted interpretation of the definition of the word Meta—pertaining to or noting an abstract, high-level analysis or commentary, especially one to consciously reference its own type.

metaing, Marie Kazalia, painting on Coventry Rag fine art paper
metaing, Marie Kazalia, painting on Coventry Rag fine art paper

 

 

Hyperallergic Labs Published My Painting: Repressed Memory Wallpaper

Hyperallergic Lab Published my painting, Repressed Memory Wallpaper–here is the link:

http://hyperallergic.tumblr.com/post/53328010250/marie-kazalia-repressed-memory-wallpaper-oct

Screen Shot 2013-06-19 at 6.02.43 AM

And my image has been re-blogged to many other Tumblr blogs, such as Wow Great, and  World in Their Art and others! 

Talking in Circles, a series within a series

For many months now, I’ve been working with circles, orbs, dots, spots, painting and developing each paintings as I worked. The paintings that I’m posting here are all from a series within a series I’ve titled Talking in Circles. This sub-series is designated as different due to the fact that I developed these painting ideas in my iPad before paintings them on paper. I just bought my iPad the last day of February, so I’ve had it just over two months. I discovered an iPad app called Sketchbook Pro 6 that is easy to use. I also customized my iPad with a skin from Decal Girls printed with one of my paintings, and I used one of my iPad sketches for wallpaper on my iPad–so it really feels like it is my sketchbook. The advantage of using my iPad as a sketchbook is that the entire color palette is in the Sketchbook app–no need to carry markers, pens, or pencils. Using the Sketchbook app in my iPad to try various color combinations, layering and patterning saves a lot of time developing an idea, because it is fast and easy to create it in the Sketchbook app, make a working copy and continue working on the idea. I then used my iPad sketches to and work from as I painted the paintings in this series on Lennox fine art paper using Flashe and some acrylic fine art paints.

Talking in Circles 1, Marie Kazalia May 2013
Talking in Circles 1, mixed media painting on Lennox fine art paper, Marie Kazalia May 2013
Talking in Circles 2, Marie Kazalia April 2013
Talking in Circles 2, mixed media painting on Lennox fine art paper, Marie Kazalia April 2013
Talking in Circles 2, Detail
Talking in Circles 2, Detail
Talking in Circles 3: Quincux
Talking in Circles 3: quincunx, mixed media painting on Lennox fine art paper, Marie Kazalia, May 2013